FIRST History

Team KAOS’ Robots

For the past seven years (2005-2011), Team KAOS has been striving to set the pace for the competition. Team KAOS’ members work hard for six weeks in order to create a robot designed to complete a game objective. Ultimately, hard work pays off.

 
Below is a list of Team KAOS’ past history, including any awards and robot designs pertaining to that year. To view the information credible for a particular year, click on the ‘+‘ to expand the information and on a ‘-‘ to retract it.

  • 2011 Logo Motion

    Robot – “Stinger”

    Logomotion Robot - Stinger

    Lessons Learned

    • Use build season time wisely. Pace the team into weeks.
    • Do not leave autonomous programming until the regionals.
    • Windows motors have back-and-forth play.
    • Small air compressor overheats quickly.

    Awards

    • Lone Star Regional Chairman’s Award
    • Lone Star Woodie Flower’s Finalist Award
    • Entrepreneurship Award
    • Best Website Award

    Pros

    • Chain could be tightened very easily.
    • Pneumatics were connected to the cRio Module instead of onto Spikes.
    • Drive system was very efficient.
    • Electronics were easily accessible.

    Cons

    • Autonomous needed to be perfected.
    • Transmissions were very hard to replace.
    • Arm mechanism was very flimsy due to windows motors and bungee cord.
    • Bumper attachments made bumper replacement a very hard task.

  • 2010 Breakaway

    Robot – “Socco”

    Lessons Learned

    • Practice and test every part of the robot before going to competition
    • Attempt to build a robot that can score very easily

    Awards

    • Rockwell Innovation in Control Award
    • Entrepreneurship Award

    Pros

    • Fast Drive System
    • Very reliable ball maneuverability
    • Could climb very easily with 8in. Wheels
    • Consistent autonomous

    Cons

    • Kicker could only kick three balls before having to recharge air
    • Wheel brackets were flimsy
    • Arm design was to weak
    • Electronics were very unorganized during competition

  • 2009 Lunacy

    Robot

    Pros

    • Effective ball retriever
    • Basket was effective

    Cons

    • Drive system was not dependable (Motors were burnt)
    • Camera system was not dependable

    Lessons Learned

    • Test camera system more
    • Test real life situations before competition

  • 2008 Overdrive

    Robot

    Lessons Learned

    • Needed a more dependable drive system
    • Robot lacked overall stability

    Awards

    Pros

    • Effective Launching Mechanism
    • Adequate Drive System

    Cons

    • Front was unstable
    • Forks could be bent easily
    • Could not place the ball at the end of the match

  • 2007 Rack 'N Roll

    Robot

    Awards

    • Creativity Award

    Pros

    • Pivots on a Dime

    Cons

    • Weak ramps and weak arm
    • Could only score two out of three levels

    Lessons Learned

    • Keep drive system simple
    • Needed better arm design

  • 2006 Aim High

    Robot

    Lessons Learned

    • Very maneuverable but could be pushed easily
    • Lifting mechanism was very effective

    Pros

    • Maneuverable
    • Could collect the balls efficiently and fast
    • Simple design
    • Secured components
    • Very fast

    Cons

    • Could be pushed around easily
    • Trap door could be blocked
    • Balls could get stuck
    • The robot could be blocked easily

  • 2005 Triple Play

      Awards

    • Johnson&Johnson Sportsmanship Award

    Lessons Learned

    • Direct drive for wheels is very maneuverable but can be easily pushed
    • Arm design needs to be simpler, yet more efficient.

    Pros

    • Drive system was very maneuverable

    Cons

    • Arm design was weak
    • Lifting mechanism was too complicated
    • Got tangled with other robots easily
    • Could be pushed easily

 

Past Competition Details

Below is a list of all the past FIRST competitions, including the competition design and game objective. To view the information credible for a particular year, click on the ‘+‘ to expand the information and on a ‘-‘ to retract it.

  • 2011 Logo Motion

    Logo Motion Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In the 2011 game, LOGO MOTION™, two alliances of three teams compete on a 27-by-54-foot field with poles, attempting to earn points by hanging as many triangle, circle, and square logo pieces as possible. Bonus points are earned for each robot that can hang and assemble logo pieces to form the FIRST logo. Robots can also deploy Mini-Bots to climb vertical poles for a chance to earn additional points.

  • 2010 Breakaway

    Lunacy Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Two alliances of three teams compete on a 27-by-54-foot field with bumps, attempting to earn points by collecting soccer balls in goals. Additional bonus points are earned for each robot suspended in air and not touching the field at the end of the match.

  • 2009 Lunacy

    Breakaway Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In the 2009 game, LUNACY robots are designed to pick up 9″ game balls and score them in trailers hitched to their opponents‟ robots for points during a 2 minute and 15 second match. Additional points are awarded for scoring a special game ball, the Super Cell, in the opponents’ trailers during the last 20 seconds of the match. “LUNACY” is played on a low-friction floor, which means teams must contend with the laws of physics.

  • 2008 Overdrive

    Overdrive Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In the 2008 game, “FIRST Overdrive,” students‟ robots are designed to racearound a track knocking down 40″ inflated Trackballs and moving them around the track, passing them either over or under a 6’6″ overpass. Extra points are scored by robots positioning the Trackballs back on the overpass before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

  • 2007 Rack 'N‟ Roll

    Rack 'N Roll Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In the 2007 game, “Rack ‘N‟ Roll,” students‟ robots are designed to hang inflated colored tubes on pegs configured in rows and columns on a 10-foot high center “rack” structure. Extra points are scored by robots being in their home zone and lifted more than 4” off the floor by another robot before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

  • 2006 Aim High

    Aim High Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In the 2006 game, “Aim High,” students‟ robots are designed to launch balls into goals while human players enter balls into play and score points by throwing/pushing balls into corner goals. Extra points are scored by robots racing back to their end zones and climbing the ramp to the platform before the end of the 2 minute and 10 second match.

  • 2005 Triple Play

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    The game for the 2005 season is played on a 27′ wide by 52′ long playing field with the 9 goals configured in 3 x 3 matrix, similar to tic-tac-toe. The robots will attempt to place the red and blue game tetras in or on one or more of the nine goals to score points and “claim ownership” of the goals.

  • 2004 Raising the Bar

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    The game for the 2004 season requires robots to collect and pass 13” balls to the human player to then shoot them into fixed and moveable goals. There are three 30” balls on the playing field that can be placed on top of any goal by a robot, which will double the point value in the goal. Additionally, robots may attempt to “hang‟ from a 10‟ bar.

  • 2003 Stack Attack

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    The game for the 2003 season requires robots to collect and stack plastic storage containers on their side of the playing field. The location of the robots and containers and the height of the stacks at the end of the match determine each team‟s score for the round.

  • 2002 Zone Zeal

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Each 2 minute match begins with the 24‟ x 48‟ field broken up into 5 zones and set up as follows. Four robots start on the playing field and are paired in alliances of 2. There are 2 robots at diagonally opposite corners, 10 soccer balls in each driver station area, 20 soccer balls centered along each side of the field, and 3 moveable goals weighing approximately 130 lbs each in the center zone. The strategies are endless, but the basic objectives are simple. Robots race around the playing field trying to gather balls, place them into goals, place the goals in their scoring zone, and return their robot to their starting zone before the 2 minutes have elapsed

  • 2001 Diabolical Dynamics

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Four teams work together as one alliance to try to achieve as high a score as possible in each match. Points are scored by placing balls in their goal, and by positioning their robots and goals in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of each match, the alliance station contains twenty small balls. In addition there are twenty small balls and four large balls on the far side of the field which may be used to score points. At the end of the two minute match, points are awarded as follows: the alliance will receive one point for each small ball in the goal and not in contact with a robot, and ten points for each large ball in the goal and not in contact with a robot. Each alliance will receive ten points for each robot that is in the End Zone. An additional ten points will be added if the stretcher is in the End Zone. The alliance doubles its score if the bridge is balanced. The alliance multiplies its score by a factor of up to three by ending the match before the two minute time limit. Each team receives the alliance score. A team multiplies its‟ score by 1.1 if its large ball is on top of a goal. Scores are rounded up to the nearest whole point after applying all applicable multipliers.

  • 2000 Co-opertition FIRST

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Four teams, paired in two alliances, will compete in each match. An alliance scores points by placing balls in their goal, and by positioning their robots in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of a match each alliance has seven yellow balls and one black ball in their station. In addition, there are fifteen yellow balls and two black balls on the far side of the field which may be scored by either alliance.

  • 1999 Double Trouble

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Points are scored by positioning “floppies,” robots, and the “puck” on the playing field. Floppies are light weight, pillow-like objects with Velcro-loop material located in the center and around the perimeter. Each alliance has ten color coded floppies located on the playing field and at the player stations. At the end of each two minute match, points are awarded as follows: Each two-team alliance will receive one point for each of its floppies that is at least 2” over and not touching the playing field surface, and less than eight feet above the surface if the playing field. Each alliance will receive three points for each of its floppies eight feet or higher over the surface of the playing field. Any robot that climbs onto the puck will multiply its alliance‟s score by three.

  • 1998 Ladder Logic

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In two minutes matches, the three robots and human players score points by placing the balls onto the side goals or into the central goal. The balls are color-coded to identify team ownership. A human player, located outside the perimeter of the field, is allowed to hand balls to the robot or throw balls directly at the goals.

  • 1997 Toroid Terror

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In two minute matches, the three robots and human players score points by placing the inner tubes onto pegs in the goal, or around the top of the goal. The tubes are color coded to identify team ownership. Human players are not allowed onto the field, but they may hand tubes to the robots or throw tubes directly onto the goal.

  • 1996 Hexagon Havoc

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In two minute matches, the three robots, with their human partners, score points by placing the balls in the
    central goal. The balls may be carried, pushed or thrown into the goal by the robots. The human players are not allowed on the playing field as they are seat-belted down at their stations, but they may score points by throwing ball(s) into the central goal. Points are awarded for balls located in the central goal atthe conclusion of each two minute match.

  • 1995 Ramp N’ Roll

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    In two minute matches, three robots race down a 30-foot raceway, over a speed bump just wide enough for two to pass through, to retrieve their 24” and 30” vinyl balls. To score, they must carry the ball(s) back up the raceway and push or shoot the ball over a nine-foot field goal from either the playing floor or a raised platform area, all the while trying to keep their opponents from scoring. Teams may score more than once with each ball – the smaller ball is worth two points and the larger ball is worth three points.

  • 1994 Tower Power

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Contestants attempt to place as many of their soccer ballspossible inside one of two goals. In each match, three-team alliances compete to place 12 balls of their team color inside either the high goal, worth 3 points, or in the low goal, worth one point per ball. The winner is the team that has the highest total point value of soccer balls within the two goals at the end of the two minute match. In the case of a tie, the team with more balls in the upper goal wins.

  • 1993 Rug Rage

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Contestants attempt to collect balls from either the playing field or their opponents‟ goals, place them in their own goals, and defend them. There are five large air-filled kick balls each worth five points, and twenty smaller water-filled balls worth one point each. The winner is the team with the highest total point value of balls within their foal at the conclusion of a two minute match. In the case of a tie, the team with the most large balls wins. If still a tie, the team which collected their balls first wins.

  • 1992 Maize Craze

    Triple Play Competition Image

    Team Objective

    Four contestants vie in a round to see who can collect the highest point value total of tennis balls, return to home base, and defend their cache successfully. Each round is two minutes long. The game is played on a 16‟ X 16‟ square playing arena covered with 1-1/2” layer of whole corn kernels.